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References

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Authors

This overview was written by Shirley L. Maina and Jane Villa-Lobos (Smithsonian Institution, Department of Botany, NHB 166, Washington, DC 20560, U.S.A.).

Acknowledgements

The preparation of this text has involved a number of individuals. Particular thanks go to Dr Stanwyn Shetler (Smithsonian Institution, Department of Botany, NHB 166, Washington, DC 20560, U.S.A.) and Dr Nancy Morin (Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St Louis, MO 63166, U.S.A.) who reviewed an earlier draft and provided additional information. Valuable comments and information were also provided by the following: Raymond Angelo (New England Botanical Club Herbarium, Harvard University, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.), Dr George Argus (Canadian Museum of Nature, National Herbarium of Canada, P.O. Box 3443, Sta. "D", Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1P 6P4), Dr Theodore Barkley (Kansas State University, Division of Biology, Ackert Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, U.S.A.), Dr Luc Brouillet (Institut botanique, Université de Montréal, 4101, rue Sherbrooke est, Montréal, Québec H1X 2B2, Canada), Dr Ronald Hartman (University of Wyoming, 3165 University Station, Laramie, WY 82701-3165, U.S.A.), Dr Marshall Johnston (University of Texas, Plant Resources Center, Botany Department, Austin, TX 78713-7640, U.S.A.), Dr Brien Meilleur (Center for Plant Conservation, Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St Louis, MO 63166, U.S.A.), Dr Leila Shultz (Harvard University, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.), Dr Richard Spellenberg (New Mexico State University, Biology Department, P.O. Box 3AF, Las Cruces, NM 88003, U.S.A.), and Anukriti Sud (Center for Plant Conservation, Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St Louis, MO 63166, U.S.A.). Information on rare plants was provided by the Network of Natural Heritage Programs and Conservation Data Centers and The Nature Conservancy and compiled by Lynn Kutner (The Nature Conservancy, 1815 N. Lynn St., Arlington, VA 22209, U.S.A.). Data on numbers of native vascular plant species were prepared by J. T. Kartesz (Biota of North America Program, North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3375, U.S.A.).

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