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CPD Site NA16, California Floristic Province, U.S.A. and Mexico

TABLE 17. APPROXIMATE PRISTINE AND PRESENT AREA (HECTARES) AND PERCENTAGE OF CHANGE FOR MAJOR VEGETATION TYPES IN CALIFORNIAa
Pristine b Present c
(c. 1800) (c. 1990) % change
Forests, woodlands, and scrub
  Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga) 815,900 717,100 -12.1
  Mixed conifer 5,4478,000 3,751,000 -32.1
  Redwood (Sequoia, Sequoiadendron) 938,900 635,400 -32.3
  Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) - shrub 686,000 1,073,000 +56.4
  Oak 3,867,000 3,809,000 -1.5
  Riparian (Central Valley only) 373,000 41,300 -88.9
  Chaparral 3,440,000 3,141,000 -8.7
  Montane chaparral 232,000 420,500 +81.3
Herbaceous
  North coastal bunchgrass 356,000 36,400 -90.0
  Needlegrass (Stipa) steppe 5,350,900 400 -99.9
  Annual grassland 400 3,502,000 +8653.0
  Alpine meadow 302,000 96,300 -68.2
  Coastal wetlands 102,400 20,600 -80   
  Inland wetlands 1,600,000 101,000 -94   
  Tule (Scirpus) marsh 752,300 233,000 -69.0
  Urban and agriculture (excluding grazing) 400 6,155,800 +15,211   
Sources:
a Primary source: Barbour et al. (1991). Figures are for vegetation types throughout the state of California. They have not been recalculated to exclude desert areas east of the CFP and include the Oregon and Baja California portions of the CFP. For the vegetation types listed, percentages of change for California are probably similar to those for the CFP. Figures originally given in acres were converted to ha with the same number of significant digits.
b Figures taken from Barbour and Major (1977), except: riparian from Katibah (1984); annual grassland and urban from Barbour et al. (1991); wetlands from Jones and Stokes Associates (1987).
c Figures taken from Forest and Rangeland Resources Assessment Program (1988), except: riparian from Katibah (1984); needlegrass from Barbour et al. (1991); wetlands from Jones and Stokes Associates (1987).